Hi, I’m Thomas Wilburn, newsroom web developer here at The Seattle Times. I work with editors and reporters to tell stories on the web, ranging from data visualizations to custom news applications. One of my most important tools for putting out great projects under deadline pressure is our news app template.

Digital storytelling is not new at The Seattle Times ā€” you only have to look to Sea Change or our election guides to see that ā€” but it hasn’t had a consistent process for development. Some of our news apps were built in Django, some in WordPress, and others in notepad.exe, depending on the staff assigned and their mood at the time. When I joined the newsroom earlier this year, one of my goals was to create a standard platform for digital projects, generating static files for ease of maintenance and low-stress hosting.

The result is a scaffolding system built on top of Grunt and NodeJS for producing news applications with the absolute minimum of friction (editorial or technical). In addition to populating a project with boilerplate HTML, the project initialization process also sets up the following helpful features:

  • A local development server, with live reload integration
  • Lo-dash templates, with some useful built-in helper functions
  • LESS and JavaScript compilation via AMD modules
  • A “watch” server to run build tasks automatically whenever files change
  • Bower pre-configured to install client-side libraries in a standard location
  • The ability to pull data from CSV, JSON, or Google Docs
  • One-command publication to Amazon S3

In many ways, this list is similar to scaffolding solutions from other organizations, including the NPR app template and the Chicago Tribune’s Tarbell. However, being built on NodeJS, the Seattle Times template is a bit easier to set up, and runs on more diverse software (namely, Windows). As a result, it’s been easy to get our web producers working on the same stack that we use for our big projects.

Our experiences using this app scaffolding have been positive so far. Using this scaffolding, we can be up and running on a new project in minutes, and the common structure means that it’s easy to reuse components from one app to another. Fast deployment makes our development faster, and being able to pull from Google Docs makes it easier to bring in editors and reporters. If they can use a spreadsheet, they can edit our interactives. We’ve used it to power many of our online features this year, including “Where the Bidding Wars Are?” and our Oso Landslide timeline. It even runs our Seahawks fan map!

As big proponents of open-source software, our team believes this kind of slick development experience is just too cool to keep to ourselves. So we’ve made our scaffolding available on GitHub under a GPL license. There are a few Seattle Times-specific bits you’ll need to adapt if you use it for yourself, such as our ad and tracking code. But other than that, I think it could be useful for anyone building static sites ā€” inside or outside of a newspaper. If you build something with it, we’d love to hear about it!